Author Archives: NeuroscienceLab

New Ways to Nudge the Brain


New neurostimulation technology works safely and non-invasively to modify brain activity. The findings may provide some foundational knowledge for the development of future technologies that could expedite cognitive processes. Source: Neuroscience News

Meditation for Mind-Control


Eight sessions of mindfulness-based awareness training give participants a significant edge in their ability to control brain-computer interfaces and the time it took to achieve proficiency over those who did not experience meditation training. Source: Neuroscience News

Regular Doses of Awe Can Boost Emotional Wellbeing


A regular dose of awe is a simple way to boost healthy ‘prosocial’ emotions such as compassion and gratitude, according to a new study by researchers at the UC San Francisco Memory and Aging Center (MAC) and the Global Brain Health Institute (GBHI) — a partnership between UCSF and Trinity College Dublin to improve brain health worldwide. Source: Technology Networks

Here’s What You Can Learn About Architecture from Tracking People’s Eye Movements


While many architects have long clung to the old “form follows function” adage, form follows brain function might be the motto of today’s advertisers and automakers, who increasingly use high-tech tools to understand hidden human behaviors, and then design their products to meet them (without ever asking our permission!). Source: Common Edge: “Game-Changing Eye-Tracking Studies Reveal How We Actually See Architecture.”

What Neuroscience Says About Modern Architecture Approach


How did modern architecture happen? How did we evolve so quickly from architecture that had ornament and detail, to buildings that were often blank and devoid of detail? Why did the look and feel of buildings shift so dramatically in the early 20th century? History holds that modernism was the idealistic impulse that emerged out of the physical, moral and spiritual wreckage of the First World War. While there were other factors at work as well, this explanation, though undoubtedly true, […]

Laughter Acts as a Stress Buffer, and Even Smiling Helps


People who laugh frequently in their everyday lives may be better equipped to deal with stressful events – although this does not seem to apply to the intensity of laughter. These are the findings reported by a research team from the University of Basel in the journal PLOS ONE. Source: “Does laughing have a stress-buffering effect in daily life? An intensive longitudinal study” by Thea Zander-Schellenberg, Isabella Mutschler Collins, Marcel Miché, Camille Guttmann, Roselind Lieb, Karina Wahl. PLOS ONE.

Study Helps to Settle Debate on Roles of REM and Non-REM Sleep in Visual Learning


During non-REM sleep, visual areas of the brain exhibit an excitation/inhibition balance indicative of increased plasticity. REM sleep appears to be essential for people to reap the benefits of the increased plasticity that occurs during NREM sleep. Source: “20 Hz Steady-State Response in Somatosensory Cortex During Induction of Tactile Perceptual Learning Through LTP-Like Sensory Stimulation”. by Hubert Dinse et al. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.

Sex differences in human brain anatomy


A scientific analysis of more than 2,000 brain scans found evidence for highly reproducible sex differences in the volume of certain regions in the human brain. Source: National Institutes of Health

Scientists Observe Learning Processes Online in the Brain


Repeatedly administered tactile simulation over a sustained period of time alters neural processing of the hand area in the brain. The observable changes over time illustrate neuroplasticity and shed new light on the process of learning. Source: Neuroscience News

How Playing the Drums Changes the Brain


People who play drums regularly for years differ from unmusical people in their brain structure and function. The results of a study by researchers from Bochum suggest that they have fewer, but thicker fibers in the main connecting tract between the two halves of the brain. In addition, their motor brain areas are organized more efficiently. Source: TechnologyWorks